Tournaments 2011

The XII Scottish Open 18,19,20 February, 2011

 

 

 

The Winners

2011

2010

2007

2006

2005

2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998

Neil Webb

Stewart Pemberton

Adrian Jones

Tim Line

Peter Christmas

Rachel Rhodes
Peter Chan
Ray Tannen
Wayne Auty
Lawrence Powell
Sean Casey
Neil Webb

 

Neil Webb 2011 & 1998

 

Main (19)

1

2

3/4

3/4

5/8

5/8

5/8

5/8

Neil Webb
Neil Oswald
Tim Line
Neil Everitt
Alastair Woods
William Spiers
John Frame
Jonathan Frame

Cons (15)

1

2

3/4

3/4

5/8

5/8

5/8

5/8

Martin Barkwill
Dan Tutchings
William Spiers
John Frame
Alastair Woods
Mark Calderbank
Ian Hesketh
Jonathan Frame

Last Chance (16)

1

2

3/4

3/4

Uldis Lapikens
Gareth Timms
Ginge Fullen
Ian Hesketh

Haggis (16)

1

2

3/4

3/4

Rob Tutchings
Jonathan Frame
Dan Tutchings
Mark Calderbank

Friday 500 (9)

1

2

3/4

3/4

5/8

5/8

5/8

5/8

Martin Barkwill
Ginge Fullen
Sam
Tim Line
Ian Hesketh
Gareth Timms
Hazel
Billy Sharpe

Poker (10)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Jonathan Frame
Mark Calderbank
Tim Line
Martin Barkwill
Dan Tutchings
Billy Sharp
Phil Tutchings
Rob Tutchings

Team (5)

1

2

Gareth Timms
Ginge Fullen

Beginners (6)

1

2

Arlene Addison

Penny

GP Points from this event
40.45
31.54
28.51
23.52
23.52
22.48
17.55
17.55
16.51
16.51
15.25
10.50
10.50
10.50
10.50
10.50
10.50
10.50
8.50
Neil Webb
Neil Oswald
Martin Barkwill
Neil Everitt
Tim Line
Dan Tutchings
John Frame
William Spiers
Alastair Woods
Jonathan Frame
Uldis Lapikens
Billy Sharp
Gareth Timms
Ginge Fullen
Ian Hesketh
Mark Calderbank
Philip Tutchings
Robert Tutchings
Stewart Wilson

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Pts.
AP
Player
19.95
16.94
13.93
13.93
13.93
11.92
9.97
9.97
8.92
8.92
5.98
5.98
4.91
4.91
4.91
4.91
4.91
2.97
2.97

2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1

Neil Webb
Neil Oswald
Martin Barkwill
Neil Everitt
Tim Line
Dan Tutchings
John Frame
William Spiers
Alastair Woods
Jonathan Frame
Ian Hesketh
Mark Calderbank
Phil Tutchings
Billy Sharp
Gareth Timms
Ginge Fullen
Rob Tutchings
Stewart Wilson
Uldis Lapikens

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The Scottish Open 18,19,20, February, 2011

Report by Michael Crane

It wasn't the biggest turnout we've ever had, in fact, it was the smallest! Unlike last year there were fewer entrants from south of the border and because Stirling is so far from Edinburgh, few Scots turned out! But, despite all this it was a successful tournament and I appreciate the effort everyone that turned up made to be there.

Main (19): Thanks to a 1st Round bye, Neil Webb (the first winner of this event in 1998), soon made it to the Final. Here he met new-member, Neil Oswald, playing in his first tournament. Neil O had beaten Tim Line (2006 winner) in the semi and Neil W had beaten another Neil, Neil Everitt in his semi. Of the three Neils entered, all of them got to the semis!

Main: Neil Webb and Neil Oswald

In the all-Scottish Final (although technically, not a Scot, Neil W has lived there long enough to be one!), nerves got the better of Neil O and for the second time, Neil Webb emerged the Scottish Open champion. This Scottish victory also pervaded other elements: The Last Chance (16) saw Scot, Gareth Timms coming in Runner-up to Uldis Lapikens, the Haggis (16) saw Scot, Jonathan Frame coming in Runner-up to Rob Tutchings. In the Consolation (15), Geordie, Martin Barkwill got the better of Dan Tutchings. Martin also won the Friday 500 (9) when he beat Scot, Ginge Fullen in the Final.

 

Consolation: Martin Barkwill and Dan Tutchings
Last Chance: Uldis Lapikens and Gareth Timms
The Haggis: Rob Tutchings and Jonathan Frame
The Beginner's Final: Arlene and Penny
   
Beginner's: Arlene and Penny

 

The Scots continued their attack on Saturday night: In the Poker (10), Jonathan Frame came out #1, with Mark Calderbank and Tim Line #2 and #3. In the Team (5), Scots, Gareth Timms and Ginge Fullen came 1st and 2nd.

Of course, the Scots took home the top two places (and £50 of my money!) in the Beginner's (6) in which Arlene Addison beat her friend, Penny in the Final.

Finally. The tournament went along smoothly, no problems or hiccups. I'd like to thank Gareth Timms and Hazel from the Edinburgh Backgammon Club for their support, and a big thank you to the Sassenachs that travelled overnight to attend - some of them defying death on the way!

Next year I am hoping for a return to Edinburgh but if it is to survive in the future we will need to increase the attendance. After 2012 I will have a better idea of what to expect. What we really need is the return of John Slattery!

 

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An Interview with John Slattery by Sharen Crane. February 8th, 2003

 

Sharen Crane is the wife of Biba Director, Michael Crane. She has been his assistant director for ten years and is very experienced in tournament directing. Michael is grooming her to take over so that he can relax and play.

I first met you at the inaugural Scottish Open in 1998 where you were the Consolation Runner-up. How long have you been playing backgammon and how did you learn?

I have been playing since 1997, 5 years now. I learnt by just watching. In actual fact what I did was summon most of the top UK players to my place in Scotland and paid for my lessons highly! I think £150,000 was what I lost in the first two years. A lot of it to people like Mardi Ohannessian and John Clark. It was like learning to swim by jumping in at the deep end.

Whilst learning, what backgammon books did you read, and have read since?

The first one I read was one of Robin Clay’s; I think it was called Backgammon for Winners. I thought it was a well laid out book, but I would probably disagree with some of the content now, but it was a good grounding. Magriel’s book 'Backgammon' was the second one I read, which gives you a whole set of concepts.

A lot of players use bots nowadays. Do you prefer Snowie or Jellyfish and do you analyse any of your games?

I don’t analyse anything. I am not a big fan of Snowie or Jellyfish because they are computers and people are human and you have to play the person rather than play like a computer, because the computer plays as if it is playing another computer. Humans have emotions, so you build up a repertoire so you know regardless of what Snowie says, when some people should be cubed and when they shouldn’t, just by their own actions. It’s a bit like poker, only you can see what is going on, you get tell tale signs. Very seldom do I give anything away I have a poker face for backgammon.

Over the years which players do you think have influenced you?

David Levy, John Clark, Mardi, Dod Davies. What I felt when I was playing these people is that you can take a little from each of their games, you know there are some good points in each of them and you try and collect all of this. But you could live to a hundred and still be learning.

You have become very successful over the last three years; to what do you attribute this?

I play a lot and certainly the more time you put into it you become more successful. I have always been a bit of a strategist so the game suits me very well.

Every time you come to a Biba tournament (and there have been many since that first Scottish encounter), you always seem to have another board. How many boards do you now own and is there one which you favour over others?

I own 17 I think. I play on them all by rotation. If I have a really bad session, I throw that board to the back of the pile and start with the next one. I’m not all that superstitious to be honest but I do like to rotate them and give them all a bit of use. There is no point in having boards for the sake of having them if you are not going to use them. I may die tomorrow who knows.

Are you planning on having them buried with you?

To be honest I have actually put some bits in my will regarding my boards, but you will have to wait and see.

You play a lot of backgammon. Do you prefer Tournament, Head to Head or Chouette?

In order of preference I would say tournament, head to head then chouette. Chouette last because I like to play backgammon and I think what put me off chouette was that I used to go to Ealing, and play chouette on a Wednesday night and there used to be 11 or 12 players there, so if you got into the box, which first of all you waited about two hours to get into the box, and then all of a sudden all of these cubes are thrown at you and you know if you don’t
take them you have got to wait another two hours for a game, so it then screws your decisions. I don’t mind chouettes if there is a maximum of four people, but to play in big chouettes puts me off.

Apart from backgammon, what other games of chance/gambling have you played?

Blackjack. I don’t so much like gambling, I don’t consider myself so much a gambler, and I like to feel that I can put odds in my favour. So it’s not so much a gamble if you like. Blackjack was my big love before backgammon, I have been told I should be playing Poker because of my poker face but I feel if you diversify too much you dilute your skill and I would rather concentrate on that.

I've heard that you are playing backgammon somewhere every day of the week. You appear to live backgammon; do you ever see a time when you won’t play anymore?

At this stage no, but I could have said the same about blackjack. Things change, I am having fun with it and so long as I am having fun then I will carry on. If I am not enjoying it I will stop and it doesn’t matter if I am making a lot of money. I made a lot of money at blackjack and I stopped because I wasn’t enjoying it, so the money is not the driving force, it is just for fun.

You have become a bit of a celebrity, especially well known for you waistcoats; when did this start and do you make them yourself?

This probably started 10 years ago, I have them all made, I don’t make them myself (laughs) I don’t have the time. I’m not very practical when it comes to these things; I commission people to make them for me. I do design them myself; the people who make the waistcoats know what I am like so I don’t get odd looks anymore. I like to have fun with the whole thing, I am worse than a woman in some cases, I love to dress up and have fun with it.

An addition to the waistcoats, your latest trademark is the trilby. What is the next trademark going to be?

I go off and on with the trilby, I used to wear one before but I went off it, and then came back to it. I have had some new creations done. I will be introducing them at the Scottish Open, the new style. If you want to see it you have to come to the Scottish Open.

Finally, I understand you were in a punk rock band many years ago and that you cut a record is that true?

 

It is and I have done records yes. Do you have a record player because it’s on vinyl so I’ll look one out for you?

 

Thank you John.

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