Wednesday, September 25, 2013 9:23

Tournaments 2013

The Robin Hood Trophy, 20-22 September, 2013

 

 

 

 

The Winners

2013

Peter Christmas

 

Peter Christmas - Robin Hood Champion 2013

 

Main

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Peter Christmas
Richard Biddle
Gerry Enslin
Bob Bruce
Paul Barwick
Conrad Cooper
Colin Owen
Sean Thomas

Consolation

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Bob Bruce
Deana Fawcett
Colin Owen
Michael Crane
Conrad Cooper
Gerry Enslin
Craig Hale
Matt Lees

Last Chance

1

2

3/4

3/4

Paul Plumptre
Craig Hale
Arthur Wright
Matt Lees

The Arrow

1

2

3/4

3/4

Peter Finnimore
Matt Lees
Peter Chan
Conrad Cooper

Friday Warm-up

1

2

3/4

3/4

Michael Crane
Gerry Enslin
Richard Biddle
Arthur Wright
Gang Bang!

1

2

Peter Chan
Peter Finnimore

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.

 

 

 

The Robin Hood Trophy, 20-22 September, 2013

Report by Michael Crane

 

It was a fine and pleasant day in Nottingham and a bunch of Merrie Men and Maid Marion (Deana Fawcett) sat down to fight out the inaugural Robin Hood Trophy in readiness for next year's official move to the Park Inn by Radisson, Nottingham.

For this event we all chose to play a Double Eliminator (lose two matches and you’re out) and it got off to a bad start for Richard Biddle when he was knocked out in the 1st Round by Colin Owen. In contrast to this start, Peter Christmas went through all of Saturday undefeated until he faced Gerry Enslin, also undefeated, in the 'semi-final'. It was a tough match and Peter's arrows flew straight and true (albeit a tad wind-assisted) and he made it to the Main Final.

In the 'second draw' Richard's progress mirrored Peter's as he fought and beat Peter Finnimore, Sean Thomas, Paul Barwick, Bob Bruce and then Gerry. The winner of this match would get back into the Main Final to face-off against Peter. Richard (the Lionheart?) prevailed and he went to face Peter as Gerry dropped into the Progressive Consolation.

In the Final, Peter, undefeated, had to win just one of two 11 point matches. Richard had to win two in a row. It got off to a bad start for Peter for even though he won the fist game the score soon went against him nearly all the way through. Peter's score is shown first. 1-0, 1-2, 1-3, 1-5, 2-5, 3-5, 3-6, 3-8, 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 6-9, 7-9 and then 8-9 and it's here where all the exciting stuff (and a bit of the boring stuff) occurs.

It was a 'even' game in that both players made 12 errors between (Peter 5, Richard 7) within which each made three blunders. Although the analysis is XG++ there's little doubt that deeper rollouts would change the outcome dramatically . . . but if someone wants to download the 'raw' file and roll it out, please do and send me the resulting file. You can see the match files here (when available).

Anywho, back to the game. It bowls along fairly well for Richard (white) as he makes four home points with Peter nestling snugly between the 1- and 3-points when Richard makes his first big mistake.

 


White to play 62

Black has just danced with 55 and now would be a good time get a checker into the outer board with a view to closing off the 4- or bar-point. To this end the best play (according to XG) is 18/10. Richard goes with 20/18, 20/14.

Leaving the black 5-point is a tad too early and it's value is worth more than moving out and to the the black bar-point. Peter dances with 63 and continues dancing for three more rolls, during which time Richard has progressed slowly towards his second big mistake.


White to play 44

There's always scope for error when moving doubles and this one is no exception. Having had to shift points with a previous Snake-eyes, white has to regain the crucial 6-point. So, moving 18/14(2), 11/7(2) and making the bar-point is wrong.

Better to bring the back checkers all the way around 18/10(2) and end up with a load of good 6-point-making rolls. As it turned out it mattered not what white did for black's return off the bar of 62: 25/17* was always going to happen.

Richard re-enters easily if not safely and soon he's back almost where he started, holding the black 5-point.


White to play 61

Quite clearly 7/6* is essential as white tries to get it back. When he moved 6/4(2) earlier (no choice) he was heard to say, "A fool and his 6-point are easy parted." How true it was turning out.

How to play the 6? Well, Richard went with 14/8, a bold play that tended to leave his back checkers isolated in his attempt to regain the 6-point. Here it would have been better to keep in touch with all his checkers and go with 20/14.

Peter missed, 32: 25/23/63. Richard replied, 32: 11/6 and got back his lost 6-point and then it came to Peter's first of three biggies.


Black to play 21

You'd think it difficult to make a big blunder with such small dice, wouldn't you? Peter found a way to do it, he simply played one checker 6/3! He's got to stop white's runner getting round and forming that all important 6-prime. He can't stop double-six (unlikely roll) but he can inhibit white's back checkers movement with 13/12, 6/4. As it turn out the next roll of 31 meant that the back checkers couldn't move anyway as Richard played 8/4.

Peter soon rolls a six and he's got a spare checker out. White's back checkers consolidate on his 16-point but only for a single roll after which a 52: 16/9 brings us to black's second biggie.


Black to play 42

Hitting 13/9*. Peter then decides to play safe with 4/2 and lifts his 4-point blot. Instead of lifting it he should have kept in where it was and gone 8/6 and put another builder in place to cover it if missed. Getting hit back would be a setback, but that 4-point could be crucial.

It wasn't . . . but we're a little ahead of ourselves at the moment.


White cube action

Hoping for an easy point and a move to Crawford, Richard ships across an easy drop . . . but no one told Peter is was a drop! He's well behind in the race (31 pips - approx. four rolls); he needs double-six (or at least two 6s) to escape his runners; and he's got a measly 3-point board with gaps.

Now, you must bear in mind the format of the tournament here. Peter can afford to lose this match and still win the tournament in the last game; Richard cannot afford to lose anything. By shipping across the 2-cube here he's put Peter in a good place to get lucky after recubing to four.

OK, Peter takes and we get to where I left off . . . It wasn't . . . for white's roll of 54: 25/16* hit one blot instead of two! Peter is in immediately with 22: 25/23, 13/9*, 8/6; the white runner's bid for home is halted. From here the lone white checker goes nowhere - much like Peter's last big one!


Black to play 53

Only a fool wouldn't move 23/18 and Peter's no fool; but he should have kept on going to his 15-point instead of stacking his 4-point with 8/4. There are more rolls that go right past his 8-point blot than hit it, and for that reason having a checker on his 15-point gives a better chance of sending the escapee back.


The white back checkers gets away later and soon each player is bearing off, Peter taking a slim lead here when he rolls 62 and goes three checkers up. Richard's chances dwindle down to around 26% and are then bolstered by 33 and then 22 to go slightly ahead to 53% in this position:


Black on roll

From here black rolls 63: 5/0, 3/0, white rolls 64: 6/0, 3/0 and this is the position we find ourselves in:


Black rolls 31

Peter goes from 58% right down to just below 12% as he moves 5/4, 5/2. Richard takes off two checkers and then Peter winds up and starts to shake, he rolls . . . . . and out pops double-two!

What a finish. Richard is crestfallen blaming himself for cubing Peter in when he expected him to drop and Peter can't believe his good fortune, finishing off to take the first ever Robin Hood Trophy with a Joker roll.

 

Main: Peter and Richard
Consolation: Bob and Deana

 

Meantime in the Consolation . . . Deana Fawcett was sat waiting in the Final after defeating yours truly in the non-prog semi-final. Gerry had fallen to Bob Bruce who in turn felled Colin Owen and it was a Bob and Deana Final; an encounter in which the fair Maid Marion was relegated to 2nd place.

 

Last Chance: Craig
The Arrow: Matt and Peter

 

In the Last Chance Paul Plumptre got the better of local player, Craig Hale; and in The Arrow, Peter Finnimore saw off another local player, Matt Lees to leave the 'home-side' taking home a couple of Runner-up trophies between them.

As usual we had a Friday night Warm-up and the £50 and accommodation for Southend was won by a wonderful player . . . me, when I got past Gerry Enslin in the Final.

On the Saturday evening all the Merrie Men settled into two teams and fought down to just a couple, Peters Chan and Finnimore - and Peter Chan came out the victor.

Overall it was a great weekend. Everyone had two shots at the Main, and then they all had a shot at the Consolation (except Peter and Richard), then the Last Chance and finally The Arrow. What a weekend!

Local players, Craig Hale and Conrad Cooper watch local player, Matt Lees (r) in The Arrow Final

 

 

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